VISIONARY: DANY SANZ

I could see the shock of red hair across the crowded trade show floor. It was her. I had heard so much about this woman, but so much remained a mystery to me. It seemed like just yesterday when I first caught a glimpse of her in person at the MAKE UP FOR EVER boutique on West Broadway in New York City. But it had, in fact, been nearly a decade.

She was huge — maybe not in size, but certainly in presence — wearing all black, with gentle, yet focused, black-rimmed eyes and, otherwise, seemingly very little makeup. Dany Sanz, by just walking into the room, made an understated and powerful statement with certainty — I am an artist.

And here she was, at my trade show. Yes, Dany Sanz would be presenting her first Continue reading

INSPIRED BY: KABUKI

How did you first develop an interest in make up?
Growing up in the ‘70s and early ‘80s, it would be hard not to develop an interest in make-up. When I was around 11, I found a big picture book on David Bowie at the library and I saw photos of the New Romantics from London at around the same time. The mix of future shock and nostalgia for an imaginary past inhabited by Marlene Dietrich and Greta Garbo. This became my initial motivation.

You are well known for your extraordinary creative artistry but you have an incredible body of work in beauty as well. Is there one type of work that you find more satisfying?
To quote Judy Garland,“You give the people what they want and then go buy yourself a hamburger.” I’m kidding, but there is some truth to that in the way that you should be flexible and do the make-up that’s appropriate for the project. The satisfaction comes from doing the best version of that work you can and in a relatively short amount of time so the energy at the shoot doesn’t go down.

What is the most challenging thing about being so innovative in your artistry? Do you feel the need to reinvent your work regularly?
It’s good to explore beyond your comfort zone. There’s a lot of making it up as you go along. It’s also important to know when to stop. Working with talented models, hair stylists performers, photographers and fashion stylists provide an atmosphere where Continue reading

ON SET: VE NEILL + MARWEN

How did you come to work on Welcome to Marwen?
Bill Corso called me and said he had this really unique project with Bob Zemeckis he thought I’d be great for.

Had you worked with Robert Zemeckis before?
I had never worked with him. I was really excited about it.

How does the process of creating a makeup design with Vfx work on a film like this?
It was kind of a weird thing because Billy said, “Do you mind if I design the makeup for the dolls and you recreate it on  the humans?” I said, “Absolutely not. Do whatever you want to do.” First, we scanned all the actors at Gentle Giant Studios and got copies of their heads. Billy designed renderings of what the characters would look like as dolls in
Photoshop. Then I applied the design on as human beings. In the end, we wanted to have a meld of the two characters—the dolls and humans.

Tell me about the look of the characters.
They’re all characters in Mark’s (Steve Carell) life. Each one of these dolls had a specific character and look: Anna the Soviet (Gwendoline Christie); Carlala (Eiza Gonzalez) was a señorita-type chick; Suzette (Leslie Zemeckis) was a French
maid-type character; G.I. Julie (Janelle Monáe) was a woman from rehab. We scanned Steve because Continue reading